Careers in the Medical and Dental Field

As you decide to attend medical school or have always wanted to help sick and injured people, there are plenty of positions available within the field of medicine and dentistry. The majority of medical and dental employment opportunities require many years of schooling in order for an individual to learn the appropriate information and techniques necessary to complete their job description. There are also positions within the field that do not require an extensive amount of time in college, which usually deal with administrative and assistant duties. Below you will find a collection of typical careers one may pursue within the field of medicine and dentistry:

The doctor that prevents and corrects deformities, mends injuries, and heightens the function or appearance of a patient is called a surgeon. Under this branch of medicine, there are several different kinds of concentrations, which make an average annual salary between $186,935 and $403,552. For instance, a plastic reconstructive surgeon focuses on surgically treating abnormalities of the body, an orthopedic surgeon treats injuries and diseases of the musculoskeletal system, and a heart transplant surgeon is responsible for repairing patients with end-stage cardiac disease. In order to become a surgeon, a medical degree is required with at least two to four years of surgery experience. Additional branches within the surgery field include bariatrics, neurology, and vascular.

Some careers in the medical field do not directly deal with patients and instead, spend their time in a laboratory. This is seen in the job titles of the microbiologist and pathologist, who analyze diseases by taking a look at body tissue, fluids, and other secretions. Some may perform an autopsy to identify the cause of death or the source of a disease. This particular position requires a degree in medicine from an accredited program, as well as a valid license to practice. The typical salary of a pathologist is seen between $142,460 and $292,312.

Nursing is a popular field to study in medicine, as there is an overwhelming need for individuals to fill positions all over the United States and Canada. There are also various levels of nursing that take as little as two years of schooling or training to achieve. A registered staff nurse earns an average salary of between $48,499 and $68,424 in the United States. Typical duties include the evaluation of patients and physician assistance. Some nurses administer tests and dispense medication within the limitations of the practice he or she works for. An associates degree and registered nurse certification are required to take this position. Other positions within the nursing field include certified nursing assistants and chief nurses at a hospital.

The medical world is filled with a never-ending collection of careers and jobs that look after and treat every part of the body. The anesthesiologist makes sure no pain is felt when patients are undergoing surgical procedures. This position demands a degree in medicine from an accredited school, a license to practice, and at least two to four years of anesthesiology experience.

The radiologist who uses x-rays and radioactive materials to examine and diagnose disease makes between $251,566 and $461,255. The dermatologist who treats disorders and diseases of the skin brings home between $160,851 and $301,808. The endocrinologist that specializes in hormone conditions is paid an average yearly salary between $136,521 and $223,927. Additionally, research is a big part of medicine and there are numerous people who train to become a research assistant or research scientist.

The medical director in charge of planning and directing the medical policies and programs regarding his or her organization must have a degree in medicine and have accumulated at least 15 years of experience. The typical salary for this position is between $118,141 and $269,969.

In dentistry, one may choose to pursue a career as a general dentist or prefer to lend a hand as a dental assistant. Dental hygienists, dental technicians, orthodontists, and periodontists are also suitable careers to consider in this particular field.

A dental assistant works directly under the supervision of a dentist and assists in various procedures, such as oral surgery. They are in charge of preparing and arranging the necessary tools, as well as locating records and sterilizing equipment. An associates degree from an accredited program with zero to two years experience is expected. The typical salary for a dental assistant is between $25,158 and $36,993.

A dental hygienist may clean calcareous deposits, remove tooth stains, and clean under the gumline using a variety of dental instruments. They look for signs of disease and often make visits to local schools to check in on the oral health of students. With a license, associates degree, and about two to four years of experience, one can become a dental hygienist that earns the average salary between $45,826 and $75,027.

An orthodontist is responsible for preventing and correcting undesirable formations of the teeth. In order to take on this career, he or she must have graduated from an accredited dental program and possess a license to practice dentistry. Two to four years of experience is usually a requirement to make the average salary of between $76,812 and $163,864.

Prostatitis and Dental Disease

Periodontitis is an extreme form of gum disease that can harm gingival tissues, that can injure or harm bone, and that can loosen teeth and cause them to fall out over time. This condition has already been linked to heart conditions, and now it is being linked to some cases of prostatitis too. Periodontal disease is the name for bacterial infections of the gums in the mouth. Periodontitis, or Pyorrhea, is a disease involving inflammation of the gums, often persisting unnoticed for years or decades in a patient, that results in loss of bone around teeth.

The treatment of periodontal disease begins with the removal of sub-gingival calculus (tartar). This is commonly addressed by the surgical procedures known as root planing and scaling. These procedures debride calculus by mechanically scraping it from tooth surfaces. Dental calculus, commonly known as tartar, consists almost entirely of calcium phosphate salt, the ionic derivative of calcium phosphate (the primary composition of teeth and bone). Clinically, calculus stuck to teeth appears to be hardened to the point requiring mechanical scraping for removal.

Prostatitis is a disease that affects one’s prostate gland and that can result in pain during urination, significant groin discomfort, abdominal pain, lower back pain, discomfort in the perineum, and penile and testicular pain as well. Prostatitis is also associated with the onset of a high fever, gastrointestinal difficulties, and chills in some cases too. Prostatitis is difficult to diagnose and treat, and has a wide range of debilitating and troublesome side affects. Unlike prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis often affects the lives of young and middle-aged men.

The general causes cited for the onset of prostatitis include immune system difficulties, disorders of the nervous system, emotional stress, injury to the prostate, and infection. Now, recent research published in the Journal of Periodontology suggests that there is a significant connection between periodontitis and prostatitis.

Studies done at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center showed results from a small group that inflammation from periodontal disease and prostate problems may be linked. They discuss their new evidence in the Journal of Periodontology, the official journal of the American Academy of Periodontology. The researchers compared two markers: the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) used to measure inflammation levels in prostate disease, and clinical attachment level (CAL) of the gums and teeth, which can be an indicator for periodontitis. The researchers compared two markers: the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) used to measure inflammation levels in prostate disease, and clinical attachment level (CAL) of the gums and teeth, which can be an indicator for periodontitis.

A PSA elevation of 4.0 ng/ml in the blood can be a sign of inflammation or malignancy. Patients with healthy prostate glands have lower than 4.0ng/ml levels. A CAL number greater than 2.7 mm indicates periodontitis. Like prostatitis, periodontitis also produces high inflammation levels. The testing for periodontitis involved a full examination of the condition of the gums, a check for bleeding of the gums, and for signs of gingival inflammation. The end result of the study found that the men that had both prostatitis and periodontitis had significantly higher PSA levels than those men that either had prostatitis or periodontitis alone. In essence, research has now revealed that when a man has periodontal disease he can worsen a condition like prostatitis and that gum disease contributes to the severity of prostatitis.

Sugar and Dental Decline

I graduated from dental school having been told that due to advances in preventive care most of my career would be spent replacing failed fillings, doing routine maintenance and cosmetic work as the need to treat dental decay or perform root canal treatments and extractions would be greatly reduced. However, 20 years later I find that I am performing more extractions than ever before, doing more and more root canal procedures and dealing with rampant dental decay and gum disease in all ages. Anecdotally I feel that dental disease is actually on the increase and appears to be more widespread, severe and aggressive. Dental decay rates in children has increased progressively since the 1990’s according to a study by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. It is well documented that poor socio-economic status and poor oral health are linked, and the statistics do speak for themselves. However it is not just the financially disadvantaged who are presenting with increased prevalence of dental problems, it is happening across all levels of income and background.

Why is this? We all know that sugar consumption is linked to dental decay. But what isn’t so obvious is how much our sugar consumption has increased in the last 50 years; over this period sugar consumption has tripled worldwide, mainly as a result of it being added to soft drink and cheap processed foods. However, the issue is not merely about “hidden” sugar but people living in a way that means they are eating carbohydrate rich meals, sugar laden snacks, biscuits, sweets and chocolates, drinking soft drink full of sugar and caffeine or having excess fruit and fruit juices and smoothies which are nothing more than concentrated sugar under the guise of a healthy choice. Our waistlines are expanding while at the same time, the incidence of heart disease, diabetes and dental decay continues to soar.

While excess sugar is thought to be a key cause of the obesity epidemic, obesity itself is not the root cause of disease, but it’s presence is a marker for metabolic damage and changes that lead to heart disease and diabetes. Metabolic damage, oxidative stress and systemic chronic illness also impact on oral health. Sugar is so harmful to health that there are calls for it to be controlled and taxed in the same way as tobacco and alcohol. Research indicates that sugar indirectly contributes to 35 million deaths a year worldwide as there appears to be links to the massive rise in diseases such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes since we began eating more sugar. The health effects of excess sugar consumption are similar to those of alcohol.

For the first time in human history, non-communicable diseases such as heart disease, cancer and diabetes, pose a greater health burden worldwide than infectious disease. While alcohol, tobacco and diet are all targeted as risk factors for these diseases by policymakers, Doctors are apparently calling for attention to be turned towards the dangers of excess sugar consumption. Sugar provides “empty calories”, and a growing body of evidence suggests that fructose (one component of table sugar) can trigger processes that lead to liver toxicity and a host of other chronic diseases.

While sugar was only available as fruit and honey at certain times of the year to our ancestors, it is now present in nearly all processed foods. In some parts of the world people are consuming more than 500 calories worth of sugar per day. There is growing evidence that excess sugar has an effect on human health beyond simply adding calories and can cause many of the same problems as alcohol, including high blood pressure, high blood fats, insulin resistance and diabetes. The economic and human costs of these diseases place excess consumption of sugar in the same category as smoking and drinking, and like tobacco and alcohol, sugar acts on the brain to encourage dependence. Specifically, it interferes with the workings of a hormone called ghrelin (which signals hunger to the brain) and it also affects the action of other important compounds.

Oral health is determined by various factors including diet, stress and the use of alcohol or tobacco. In ‘The World Oral Health Report’ published by WHO, it is stated “The rapidly changing (oral) disease patterns throughout the world are closely linked to changing lifestyles which include diets rich in sugars, widespread use of tobacco and increased consumption of alcohol”.

If we are to tackle not only the decline in oral health but the overall health of the population then it makes sense that we address our level of sugar consumption, but at the same time we must surely stop and observe the way in which we are living. Something has gone drastically wrong when despite our remarkable medical advances and vast knowledge of the body, nutrition and illness and disease the statistics show that we are fighting a losing battle as the prevalence of heart disease, diabetes and cancer continue to rise.

Is it possible that it is too confronting to stop and ask ourselves why are we eating so much sugar? Would it reveal things about us and the way we are that could be challenging and mean that we have to take responsibility for our daily choices? Like the fact that we eat sugar because we are exhausted, stressed or seeking comfort. Or we are seeking a moment of pleasure, a quick buzz, and a high via a sugar rush that gets our nervous system revved up and out of balance. Or we are desperate to numb the way we feel inside and avoid dealing with life. Or we do not feel alive enough just as we are without altering our brain and body chemistry with foods.

What if there was a way to live that meant we could live from what is naturally inside by simply connecting to the “real you”, a real you that once experienced you would never want to dull, compromise or alter in any way? The workshops, talks and books of Serge Benhayon of Universal Medicine and the esoteric wisdom present that we are all equally love and by connecting to and living that love the natural inner balance and harmony of the body and the real you can be restored. Is it possible then if we were to live life in this way that our need to consume vast amounts of sugar would simply drop away, and our health and oral health would improve as a consequence?

To this I would simply have to answer, yes of course, for I have witnessed it first hand for my part in not only the way I live but also in those associated with Universal Medicine and practitioners of esoteric modalities and in my own dental patients that have then gone on to implement more self-caring lifestyle choices and practices into their everyday living.